It seems to me that we all try and make things last for the long-term, or example, we want a relationship to be for the long term or we want this constant money stream to last forever?

Is this a good attitude? Why do we hold this attitude?

asked 24 Nov '09, 22:58

Pink%20Diamond's gravatar image

Pink Diamond

I think the law of inertia (Newton's first law) which relates to matter, also relates to us. The law of inertia is defined as "the property of matter by which it retains its state of rest or its velocity along a straight line so long as it is not acted upon by an external force". (

Another way of saying this is that people don't like a lot of change, unless there's a significant enough reason to change. I think this resistance to change means maintaining the status quo for the long term as long as it's working for us. Why ruin a good thing? Even where people are in uncomfortable circumstances (like a bad job), the prospect of having to look for, apply for and adjust to a different job is often more uncomfortable than staying in the current job. And such is the case with many other examples of discomforts that we tolerate for the long term. So fear plays a part and so does an element of laziness, but these are dynamics that help us maintain the comfort of sameness.

Growth of any sort requires change, and change involves an element of risk. Those who want to improve their lives over the long term must commit to a path of ongoing change that will involve some discomfort, but which will yield a long term sense of fulfillment as we continue on the journey.


answered 25 Nov '09, 09:50

John's gravatar image


Thanks for that info John, I didn't realize the law of inertia existed. Obviously it is not a fixed law as an external force has the power to change it - makes sense.

(25 Nov '09, 13:23) Michaela

Great answer John,I love learning.Thank You.

(25 Nov '09, 13:42) Roy

Interesting answer.

(25 Nov '09, 21:59) Pink Diamond
showing 2 of 3 show 1 more comments

I think this could be connected to our deep rooted fear of death. We don't want things to end and hope they'll last for longterm or forever. When we come to look at the ending as a new beginning we're no longer afraid of the end or the transition that takes place when something ends.


answered 25 Nov '09, 01:58

Michaela's gravatar image


I think it may be because we all know deep down that we are only here for a very brief period of time .Sooo we want the things we are experiencing to Last as long as possible.Not like my answers :)


answered 24 Nov '09, 23:17

Roy's gravatar image


edited 25 Nov '09, 00:24

I can tell you from my personal point of view that (to a certain extent) it's laziness. I want to solve the money problem once, and not have to think about it anymore. I want a relationship that is already "perfect," so I don't have to constantly work on it all the time.

Life is not like that (thank goodness, or we would never grow).


answered 25 Nov '09, 00:04

Vesuvius's gravatar image


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Asked: 24 Nov '09, 22:58

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Last updated: 25 Nov '09, 09:50

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