Hi All,

From all the discussion happening recently I understand that Focus blocks is a very effective process for raising one's vibration. I tried it once earlier but didn't do very well, I want to start doing it again and want some help on a very basic question.

I usually write my Focus blocks on an excel sheet for convenience. When i sit to do some focus blocks, because I am on my pc, i tend to write 2-3 statements together on one topic. Is this right or I should have certain gap between writing the next statement on the block, or what should be the ideal frequency (in terms of time) for moving on to the next sentence in the block.

Also, in the past i did a focus block and it did help me improve my vibration towards the topic for a few days, once i finished the block and a few days later my vibration again started dipping towards that topic. Hence I reread the entire block, but it did not help me raise my vibration about that topic again. Am i doing something wrong here? How to tackle this situation?

Also any guidance on how to manage focus blocks on excel sheets to randomly choose the topics, am not too proficient with excel as of yet. because of which i move across each focus block sequentially and i suppose this reduces my interest level and makes it a routine task rather than an enjoyable process.

Your help will be highly appreciated.

Thank you so much :)

asked 10 Nov '10, 19:20

Sourabh's gravatar image

Sourabh
2.1k453

edited 11 Nov '10, 05:55

Stingray's gravatar image

Stingray
88.9k16105343


i tend to write 2-3 statements together on one topic. Is this right or I should have certain gap between writing the next statement on the block, or what should be the ideal frequency (in terms of time) for moving on to the next sentence in the block

It's fine if you write a few statements into a Focus Block at once. It's even fine if you complete the whole block in one go...because then you've effectively just done a complete Focus Wheel, though in a different format.

One of the main reasons that I came up with this idea of Focus Blocks was because I would often run out of things to write on a Focus Wheel. And it just didn't feel right to me to force myself to come up with more statements until the Wheel was complete.

It felt better to just do something else instead for a while and then eventually I figured out that the something else could be working on another Focus Wheel. And, pretty soon, the idea of Focus Blocks just appeared naturally.

So that's why Focus Blocks are just incrementally-created Focus Wheels (in a random order, to keep it fun)...because of that issue of being unable to progress further on a Focus Wheel.

Focus Wheels are quite an old Abraham process dating back to the 1990s - and one that I have been telling everyone (who would listen!) is probably the most powerful process they have.

And uniquely for Abraham, within the past couple of years, they have actually reintroduced discussion of the method during their workshops.

In their new, updated version of Focus Wheels, they have hinted on occasion that you can actually just keep going with the statements until your flow of statements stops - and then you can consider the Wheel complete...rather than having to write exactly 12 statements in a circle.

So, in some respects, they appear to be moving a little more towards a Focus-Blocks-style approach anyway :)

Also, in the past i did a focus block and it did help me improve my vibration towards the topic for a few days, once i finished the block and a few days later my vibration again started dipping towards that topic. Hence I reread the entire block, but it did not help me raise my vibration about that topic again. Am i doing something wrong here? How to tackle this situation?

It's a bit tricky to answer this without having the specifics of what you wrote in the Focus Block, and what caused your vibration to start dipping again.

One of the metaphysical principles that Focus Blocks relies extensively on is that "your vibration about a topic always remains in the last place you left it".

This principle means that if I think, say, about the poor state of my car, move myself into a better-feeling place about it, and then immediately go on vacation abroad (for example) where I am not thinking about the car at all for a few weeks, then when I return my feeling about my car should be exactly the same.

I've been using this idea for years and have never found an exception to it.

So perhaps the key to your question is what made your vibration dip again on that topic?

If you've done the Focus Block correctly, you've created a vibrational ladder that will always bring you back up again to the vibrational level it peaks at.

Occasionally, you may have been in such a good-feeling place when doing that particular Focus Block that you jump further vibrationally with a statement at that time than you can can when you reread the Focus Block later when not feeling quite as good. But that's just a case of inserting a few more bridging statements as required (if you feel you want to), to make the vibrational transition a bit smoother, rather than the Focus Block failing completely.

Where the Focus Block will fail completely is if what has just caused your vibration to dip again is now something different.

For example...

Let's say I feel bad about the poor state of repair of my battered old car. So I move myself into a better-feeling place about it and now I feel good again. Some days later, I'm using my car to take someone out on a date and they remark how bad my car looks and how it makes them feel uncomfortable to be in it. Again, this makes me feel bad.

But, in this case, even though I'm feeling bad about the car, the cause of that feeling bad is different. I'm now feeling bad about what that person thought about my car rather than my car itself, even though the car still appears to be the cause.

So, for this example, re-reading your previous Focus Block is probably not going to soothe you back into a better-feeling place because the cause of the vibrational dip is different.

Hope that is clear.

As I said, without knowing specifics, it's difficult to answer this one.

If you feel this doesn't answer your question and you are willing to be more specific, then please ask this as a new Inward Quest question and we'll take a closer look :)

Also any guidance on how to manage focus blocks on excel sheets to randomly choose the topics, am not too proficient with excel as of yet. because of which i move across each focus block sequentially and i suppose this reduces my interest level and makes it a routine task rather than an enjoyable process.

I use Microsoft Excel for Focus Blocks simply because I find it easy to prototype vibrational processes with that software, since many processes are list-based, and I have a reasonable amount of experience in software development generally.

In my own approach to this, which has evolved gradually over about five years, I've written quite a number of fairly complex Excel VBA macros to automate everything that I don't want to think about consciously when molding vibrations, and that includes the random selection of Focus Blocks and the inter-mixing of Focus Blocks and Positive Aspects and many other ideas.

Those macros are really far too complicated to share and explain how they work (they were never intended for anyone else to use) and, to be honest, writing VBA code is not much of a pleasant experience anyway :)

But I am planning a proper software-based approach to Focus Blocks which I will freely share when done. But I don't have a timescale when this will be completed yet.

In the meantime, if you are not that proficient with Excel, you could always just roll some dice and skip that many tabs to choose the next sheet, or if you are able you are knowledgeable enough to generate a linked table of contents, you could try something as basic as generating a list of random numbers up to the number of sheets you have and use that to manually choose the next one.

Sorry but I don't really have any definite advice in that area. I've just found that keeping the Focus Blocks selection random somehow (with plenty of Focus Blocks to choose from) keeps the process feeling fun and fresh.

link

answered 11 Nov '10, 06:57

Stingray's gravatar image

Stingray
88.9k16105343

edited 11 Nov '10, 07:29

1

Thanks so much Stingray, its really so nice of you to take out so much of your time to ensure you explain things in as much detail as possible and make it simplest for the reader to understand, really really appreciate this!! This helped me understand Focus blocks much better and it cleared my doubts as well.Thanks once again.. U r a genius!! And yes I agree that Focus blocks is one of the most powerful processes, I really aspire to get to your level of understanding and clarity on this subject gradually but surely. Thanks for the inspiration.. God Bless!! :)

(11 Nov '10, 13:46) Sourabh

You're welcome, glad I could help

(11 Nov '10, 15:52) Stingray
Click here to create a free account

If you are seeing this message then the Inward Quest system has noticed that your web browser is behaving in an unusual way and is now blocking your active participation in this site for security reasons. As a result, among other things, you may find that you are unable to answer any questions or leave any comments. Unusual browser behavior is often caused by add-ons (ad-blocking, privacy etc) that interfere with the operation of our website. If you have installed these kinds of add-ons, we suggest you disable them for this website

Tags:

×240
×80
×54

Asked: 10 Nov '10, 19:20

Seen: 1,203 times

Last updated: 11 Nov '10, 07:29








Follow this question

By Email:

Once you sign in you will be able to subscribe for any updates here

By RSS:

Answers

Answers and Comments

Markdown Basics

  • *italic* or _italic_
  • **bold** or __bold__
  • link:[text](http://url.com/ "title")
  • image?![alt text](/path/img.jpg "title")
  • numbered list: 1. Foo 2. Bar
  • to add a line break simply add two spaces to where you would like the new line to be.
  • basic HTML tags are also supported



Related Questions