At what age or stage of development are kids adequately equipped to start exploring questions of spirituality, consciousness, ethics, and existence? Is there a roadmap or strategy for helping kids grapple with those kinds of issues? How would such development tie-in with the development of their critical thinking skills and their accumulation of life experience?

asked 22 Oct '09, 11:36

user-345%20%28google%29's gravatar image

user-345 (google)

edited 22 Oct '09, 12:32

Barry%20Allen's gravatar image

Barry Allen ♦♦

I personally was interested in spirituality from as long as I can remember. And I was full of ?'s for my mum. As I saw the human energy field around people and things then, and was aware of astral travelling, and spiritual beings. I wanted answers of what I was seeing at that time. Now having had my own children and now grandchildren. I find when they start asking ?'s is the right time to start answering them, however just answer or explore the ? at hand, that way they can absorb the answer. And slowly just take it from there and be honest with them.If you don't know an answer to something it might be a good idea to find out together. Hope this is of help. (-:


answered 22 Oct '09, 13:44

N20's gravatar image


Answering once they start asking, and giving them time to absorb the answers, are great ideas - thanks for replying.

(23 Oct '09, 02:56) user-345 (google) are welcome aswan (-:

(26 Oct '09, 15:02) N20

This isnt so much an answer as an observation of our four children.We co-create with two girls 18 & 16 and two boys 14 & 5 and the way I see it is that It isnt my job to start our children on their Spiritual path Its my job to learn everything I can from them while I focus on my own Spirituality and as I do this I have the ability to teach without teaching.We let our children decide whats best for themselves and give them any guidance they ask for.So to answer your question, they already know! Its up to us to find out what their here to teach us.Love and Light.


answered 25 Oct '09, 17:58

Roy's gravatar image


I agree with N20. I think as soon as the question arrises then it's the tme to explore it.

The funny think is that most of the time just asking the question means that we know the answer. The best thing to do when a child asks a question and you don't know the answer is to ask him/her "What do YOU think about it?" And let their imagination lead them, because imagination is the key for unlocking ALL the secrets.

At this day and age children will be born that are, as you might say, a diffrent species. There DNA will be diffrent then older folks and that's because they will be NATURALLY drown to the light. They won't have so many doubts as we did and they will find it easier to tune it to what we call the Source, God or whatever. Let's just say the vessel for recieving the information will be some-what more clearer then before.

Besides little children, especially infants are the MOST spiritual creatures of all. Why? Because they live in the present moment ALL THE TIME. They don't think about when they will get hungry but when they do, trust me, they will let you know ;)

So one way of raising those kind of children I suppose would be NOT to be so definite about ANYTHING. If a childs comes to you and seas she's been seeing angels don't say she's crazy or seek psychiatrists or drugs for that matter. Be curious with her and try to learn about her world. Don't invalidate it. Just because we can't see the wind it doesn't mean it's not their.

Another thing is to be aware that EVERYTHING you do affects EVERYONE in your surrondings, especially your kid. So ask yourself is letting her watch 4 hours of TV a day beneficial to her growth? How can you help her be more in-tune with all the energies. Being with nature is one of those things. Socializing with others is another. Reading to her, cuddling, kissing, affection is yet another. Figure out what works for you, but always, before you do anything ask yourself

"Is the thing I'm about to do life enhancing or not?" and then go from there.


answered 22 Oct '09, 14:39

wildlife's gravatar image


In my opinion, children shouldn't start with spirituality too early. Unless they show some kind of interest in it, they shouldn't be teached on that matter. Some degree of maturity is required to start with it, otherwise it can lead to fatal consequences ("ingorance is bliss"). And the age varies from person to person, but I think around 20 would be ok.


answered 22 Oct '09, 12:56

Asklepios's gravatar image


Whenever they show an interest. And check out the video here called Satan and Santa


answered 22 Oct '09, 21:15

Rebecca's gravatar image


That is a very insightful video. The answer to the question, "Is there a Santa Claus" feels like a bit of a cheat, but there is no denying her inspirational tone. It is apparent to me that it is not the child who needs guidance, but the parent.

(22 Oct '09, 22:37) Vesuvius

Vesuvius have you read or watched any Abraham Hicks before that? :>)

(22 Oct '09, 22:40) Rebecca

No I haven't. Can this video be adequately understood out of context from the rest of the teachings?

(23 Oct '09, 16:35) Vesuvius

The basic teachings of Abraham Hicks is in this video - and I find it goes very well with Quantum Theory. The two make utter and total sense to me in both the spiritual and the scientific - each proving the other. I had some reservations about Abraham Hicks at first but I went back and explored and found the message FAR too good to ignore.

(23 Oct '09, 20:33) Rebecca
showing 2 of 4 show 2 more comments

Kids should be encouraged to explore spirituality whenever they show an interest. This does not mean, however, that they are truly "ready" in a cognitive sense to understand the abstract concepts that spirituality necessarily involves. But curiosity and interest should never be stifled.

In Piaget's classic "Stages of Cognitive Development", this developmental biologist observed that age 12 and onwards began the period of what he called the "Period of Formal Operations" which he described with these characteristic behaviors: "Thought becomes more abstract, incorporating the principles of formal logic. The ability to generate abstract propositions, multiple hypotheses and their possible outcomes is evident. Thinking becomes less tied to concrete reality." (see the article by the Child Development Institute where you can see all of Piaget's stages of cognitive development.)

To be able to grasp the abstract concepts involved in spirituality, consciousness, ethics, and existence, and to integrate them in any real sense into their own identity and to consider the effects and consequences of their beliefs and actions requires a measure of sophistication not typically found in younger children. But the bottom line for me is to encourage them to explore and assist them as they request your help.

A footnote to this is the practice in synagogues and churches of recognizing a spiritual "coming of age" through confirmation classes, bar mitzvahs and bat mitzvahs. The traditions are obviously based on the experience of seeing that children around age 12 or 13 are able to comprehend enough about their religion and the spiritual concepts involved to be recognized for achieving a spiritual milestone. My only final thought would be to concur with the comment found at the beginning of the website listed above: "Children are not little adults." Handle with care!


answered 23 Oct '09, 11:17

John's gravatar image


edited 23 Oct '09, 11:25

+1 for a balanced view, and "children are not little adults."

(23 Oct '09, 22:46) Vesuvius
Click here to create a free account

If you are seeing this message then the Inward Quest system has noticed that your web browser is behaving in an unusual way and is now blocking your active participation in this site for security reasons. As a result, among other things, you may find that you are unable to answer any questions or leave any comments. Unusual browser behavior is often caused by add-ons (ad-blocking, privacy etc) that interfere with the operation of our website. If you have installed these kinds of add-ons, we suggest you disable them for this website



Asked: 22 Oct '09, 11:36

Seen: 1,217 times

Last updated: 25 Oct '09, 17:58

Follow this question

By Email:

Once you sign in you will be able to subscribe for any updates here



Answers and Comments

Markdown Basics

  • *italic* or _italic_
  • **bold** or __bold__
  • link:[text]( "title")
  • image?![alt text](/path/img.jpg "title")
  • numbered list: 1. Foo 2. Bar
  • to add a line break simply add two spaces to where you would like the new line to be.
  • basic HTML tags are also supported

Related Questions